Articles

This page brings together all the  published Articles of The Darkroom Rumor. Make your choice!

 

 

WR, A Day in Oradour: interview with Patrick Séraudie
Patrick Séraudie by Patrick Séraudie

WR, A Day in Oradour: interview with Patrick Séraudie

linked to WR, A Day in Oradour

Patrick Séraudie, a filmmaker specializing in history subjects, and the Second World War in particular, made the documentary “WR, A Day in Oradour” with Willy Ronis. A conversation about the photographer’s memories and the international history of the “Peace Movement”. Patrick Séraudie first met the photographer while preparing the film Self-portrait of a Photographer, of which he was the producer.

Robert Frank: An interview with Gerald Fox
Gerald Fox by Gerald Fox

Robert Frank: An interview with Gerald Fox

linked to Leaving Home, Coming Home : A Portrait of Robert Frank

British film director Gerald Fox has produced many portraits of artists, photographers in particular. But Robert Frank, while being an artist who opens up about his own life through his work, was nonetheless a man of mystery, complicated, withdrawn from the world. Gerald Fox revisits the story of this film, just like Frank himself, with its ups and downs, but above all exciting and human.

Das Schloss : An Interview With Sara Imloul
Sara Imloul by Sara Imloul

Das Schloss : An Interview With Sara Imloul

linked to Sara Imloul | Das Schloss

Emmanuel Bacquet: Sara Imloul, it's been five years since DK2R came to film you at work. While putting together your Das Schloss series, you explore a very personal visual poetry thanks to the view camera and paper duplicates, giving the prints a timeless appearance. Since then you've created other series, in particular Passages, which won you the Prix Levallois. Could you tell us more about your recent journey?

Bettina Rheims (by Serge Bramly)
Serge Bramly by Serge Bramly

Bettina Rheims (by Serge Bramly)

linked to Bettina Rheims, My Life

How to define what photography is, what distinguishes it from its elders, painting, engraving, drawing (to which it was for a long time subservient) or, if you'd rather, what constitutes this specific mode of representation? When Bettina Rheims began her career in the late 1970s, only a small number of books were devoted to photography and the question remained embryonic, possibly unformulated. A few studies were beginning to surface, such as Susan Sontag's; Barthes had not yet published Camera Lucida; rare were the monographs that allowed us to tackle a coherent set of works. In a way it was a new age of pioneers, both for artists and for galleries, and the public and private collections that were gradually emerging.

Fragments : an interview with Bettina Rheims
Bettina Rheims by Bettina Rheims

Fragments : an interview with Bettina Rheims

linked to Bettina Rheims, My Life

Emmnauel Bacquet: You have photographed women a lot, though not exclusively, and what is striking is the way the markers appear jumbled in your pictures. There's no apparent classification between stars and unknowns, between commissioned photos and those taken outside of any campaign.

Interview with avec Nathalie Masduraud and Valérie Urréa
Nathalie Masduraud et Valerie Urrea by Nathalie Masduraud et Valérie Urréa

Interview with avec Nathalie Masduraud and Valérie Urréa

linked to South Africa, Chromatic Existences - Episode 1: Inner City

Nathalie Masduraud and Valérie Urréa are documentary filmmakers. Beyond their personal films (on autism and dance, among others, for Valérie, and on the occupation and the French colonies for Nathalie), they join forces to produce many societal and historical documentaries.
They have thus worked in particular on Iranian and South African photography. Their joint projects generally focus on the artistic and social recognition of women.

Violence
André Rouillé by André Rouillé

Violence

linked to Crime Scenes (How to become a forensic photographer)

Violence is an infinitely diverse phenomenon in terms of its sectors, its actors, its victims, its forms, its practices and its intensities. Not all violence is the same. It can be private, public, and even legal (if not legitimate), like police violence.

Still Not There: Interview with Kimmo Koskela
Kimmo Koskela by Kimmo Koskela

Still Not There: Interview with Kimmo Koskela

linked to Still Not There, Arno Rafael Minkkinen

Kimmo Koskela is a director, visual artist and producer. His films blur the borders between documentary and film d’artiste, and demonstrate a very personal world. None of which rules out encounters: The film Still Not There, with Arno Rafael Minkkinen, attests to great creative complicity. Complicity and a relationship with photography that the director addresses for us...

Free!
Christine Delory-Momberger by Christine Delory-Momberger

Free!

linked to Around Pigalle | Jane Evelyn Atwood

Jane Evelyn Atwood is an independent woman and photographer whose freedom has been forged both through her experiences and the struggles she wages in life to protect her creative space.  But this freedom is tenuous. It must be regained with each act, each decision, each gesture and it requires unfailing integrity and authenticity. Freedom is not easy. It is a constant vigil of the self and others in a relationship of otherness that must be reinvented with each event, each encounter and each commitment.

The Fresson process
André Rouillé by André Rouillé

The Fresson process

linked to The Workshop | The Fresson Process

From the film's opening frames, Thomas Goupille plunges us into another world and another time: the workshop of the famous Fresson dynasty, master printers of photographs since 1899. The enlarger and the wooden frames from the nineteenth century, the Roberval balance, now only found at antique dealers, kitchen pans, as well as the machine that spreads gelatine on the paper, invented by great-grandfather along with the process: these are still working instruments. But by etching their era and their technical protocols in the printing process, they anchor the Fressons in the field of artistic craftsmanship, in the wake of a family tradition of quality, creativity and unique pieces, in contrast to a contemporary world sucked in by quantity, technological productivity and profit. 

Snapshots / Bernard Plossu: The Eye of Emmanuel Bacquet
Emmanuel Bacquet by Emmanuel Bacquet

Snapshots / Bernard Plossu: The Eye of Emmanuel Bacquet

linked to Bernard Plossu / Snapshots

He's not keen on legends under photographs, pregnant with meaning. Nor is he keen on the "legendary photographer" tag. "Plo" doesn't stand on ceremony. He doesn't need to. He avoids interviews, because what matters is in his photos, and talking about the rest is of secondary importance. "Photography for photography's sake." Confidences and comments are reserved for friends and family. His words have the same accuracy as his photographic writing; lucid, direct. 

Locked Rooms
Emmanuel Bacquet by Emmanuel Bacquet

Locked Rooms

linked to Snapshots | Romy Alizée

In general, things start in a room.  This is certainly true of the birth of photography. When Nicephore Niepce made his first attempts to capture an image, revealing to the world the famous view "from my window", the light must have crossed the room then the camera obscura.